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The Unrealistic Beauty Standards And Social Media

With the world around us becoming more and more exposed to social media, people around the globe have found themselves to be mesmerized by the seemingly “perfect” individuals that they see on various social media platforms.


These beauty ideals are also prominently portrayed on digital networking. There has been an increase in the number of ladies that utilize their platforms particularly to be "Instagram models." Those females meet all societal standards of beauty and good looks. The majority of such "models" have bright complexions, incredibly slim bodies, with flawless skin and facial characteristics. It isn't easy to navigate Instagram without coming across a female that meets this criterion.


It is indeed human nature to be impressed by something that seems attractive, but today, social media is filled to the brim with individuals that look heavenly.


With the social media frenzy at an all-time high now, people have started doubting their own capabilities and features.


And once women start doubting themselves, they can go to great lengths to alter their looks. This alteration includes surgeries and medical procedures, that can become botched easily.


According to a NEDA post published "Body Image and Eating Disorders," 40-60% of primary education-aged females are anxious regarding their appearance. This issue begins at an early age and traces a lady throughout her lifetime. Unattainable body ideals might result in eating disorders and mental illness. According to the same study, more than 50% of adolescent females avoid food, starve, smoke cigarettes, puke, and use medication to lose weight. Various behaviors create routines, which might lead to these psychiatric issues.


Every day women are portrayed in advertisements with perfect bodies, but what does it take to attain those bodies? The 2018 Victoria’s Secret controversy brought some terrible truths to the public’s attention.


According to Bridget Malcolm, a former Victoria’s Secret model, "At the start of 2017 it took me 10 minutes to climb a flight of stairs. I reached the top and I just had that awful, hollow feeling like, ‘this is what the rest of my life is going to look like if I don’t do something about it now." 


The perfect bodies that we see on the internet are a product of starvation and tough exercise regimes, that are unattainable for most women to achieve.


 The advertisements that we see every day show us what we should be, instead of what we are. Although brands like VS are trying to rebrand themselves, rebranding only happened after the controversies and social media awareness started doing significant damage to those perfection-obsessed brands.


As a society, we must broaden our horizons and be welcoming of all people to achieve the necessary development. We should never forget that beauty comes in all shapes and sizes.


 


 


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Tags: #SocialMedia #BodyPositivity #BeautyStandards #EatingDisorders



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