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Australia Has Signed Up To A Global Pledge To Cut Methane Emissions By 30%

Australia has signed up to a global pledge to cut methane emissions by 30% over the next decade. The UN announced the agreement on Wednesday and aims to simultaneously reduce the global economic impacts of climate change and limit one of the most potent greenhouse gases emitted from human activity.


So, this article illustrates the potential of the current situation in Australia as the prime minister cautioned that climate change is increasing the frequency of Australia's extreme weather occurrences; the Albanian government announced it will join Joe Biden's global commitment to cut methane emissions by 30% by 203. According to Professor Martyn Chipperfield, director of CSIRO’s Australian National Tidal Facility: "The benefits for Australia will be lower energy costs in terms of heating and electricity, improved air quality thanks to less coal burning; less acid rain damage thanks to less coal mining; reduced risk from floods due to reduced rainfall levels; and higher agricultural productivity because there will be more CO2 in the atmosphere, resulting in increased crop yields."



"The most significant risk will be the costs associated with extreme weather events, but that is a manageable risk. The other significant risk is that we don’t get any benefits and end up as a big hole in the ground.


In what UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called a "global turning point," 188 nations agreed on Wednesday to start curbing emissions by revisiting their existing commitments next year. The deal follows 18 months of talks. About three-quarters of global greenhouse gas emissions come from burning fossil fuels.


"Climate change is already undermining our health, security, and well-being," said Ban during the announcement of the agreement at UN headquarters. "This agreement signals the global commitment to reduce the impacts of climate change, not only for our planet but also for the 1.2 billion people worldwide whose daily lives, livelihoods, and economies are heavily affected by it."


Moreover, just days before the conference in Cancun began in earnest, US President Barack Obama announced that US emissions had increased over his first term – and that he would not try to meet his original goal of a 17% cut. Instead, he settled on an 11% target. "I am not a scientist," he said, "so I don’t argue with those who say we can’t achieve this target or that target."


 


In conclusion, it is vital to mention the idea that Australia has signed up to cut methane emissions by 30% over the next decade. The agreement furthermore was announced by the UN on Wednesday and aims to simultaneously reduce the global economic impacts of climate change and limit one of the most potent greenhouse gases emitted as a result of human activity.


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