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The Impact of Social Media on Political Mobilization: A Comparative Analysis of the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter Movements.

Abstract



This thesis aims to explore the role of social media in political mobilization by conducting a comparative analysis of the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements. Both movements gained significant attention and had a profound impact on their respective regions, utilizing social media platforms as crucial tools for organizing and disseminating information. This study seeks to examine the similarities and differences in the strategies employed, the outcomes achieved, and the challenges faced by these movements within their unique sociopolitical contexts. By analyzing the role of social media in fostering political mobilization, this research contributes to a deeper understanding of the evolving nature of political activism in the digital age.











Table of Contents
 
Abstract                                                                
Introduction                                                            
Literature Review:                                                   
Methodology:                                                           
Case Study 1: Arab Spring:                                      
Case Study 2: Black Lives Matter Movement:        
Comparative Analysis:                                             
Implications and Conclusions:                                 















Introduction

The advent of social media has revolutionized the way people communicate, connect, and engage with information, creating new opportunities and challenges for various aspects of society. In the realm of politics, social media platforms have emerged as powerful tools for political mobilization, enabling individuals and groups to amplify their voices, disseminate information, and organize collective action. The rise of digital activism has been particularly evident in the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements, where social media played a pivotal role in shaping the trajectory and outcomes of these socio-political phenomena.

The Arab Spring, which began in late 2010, witnessed a wave of uprisings across several countries in the Middle East and North Africa region. The mass protests were fueled by a desire for political freedom, economic opportunities, and social justice. Social media platforms, such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube, played a central role in mobilizing and coordinating the protests. Activists utilized these platforms to share real-time information, disseminate videos and images of government repression, and organize demonstrations, thereby circumventing traditional media channels and fostering a sense of collective identity and purpose.

Similarly, the Black Lives Matter movement, which gained prominence in 2013 following the acquittal of Trayvon Martin's killer, has utilized social media as a crucial tool for organizing and raising awareness about racial injustice and police brutality in the United States. Hashtags like #BlackLivesMatter went viral on platforms such as Twitter, sparking widespread conversations, protests, and calls for social and institutional change. Social media not only facilitated the rapid dissemination of information, but also provided a platform for marginalized communities to share their experiences, build networks of solidarity, and challenge dominant narratives.

Given the undeniable impact of social media on political mobilization, it is imperative to examine and understand the dynamics and implications of its usage within different socio-political contexts. This thesis aims to contribute to the growing body of research on digital activism by conducting a comparative analysis of the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements. By examining the strategies employed, the outcomes achieved, and the challenges faced by these movements, this research seeks to shed light on the role of social media in fostering political mobilization and shaping contemporary political landscapes.

Research Objectives and Questions

the primary objective of this thesis is to explore the impact of social media on political mobilization, specifically focusing on the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements. The probation will be guided by the following questions:

How did social media platforms contribute to the mobilization of the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements?
What were the key similarities and differences in the use of social media by these movements?
How did social media impact the coordination, communication, and organization of activists in both contexts?
What were the challenges faced by activists in utilizing social media as a political mobilization tool?
What were the long-term political and societal impacts of these movements, and how did social media contribute to these outcomes?
By addressing these questions, this research aims to provide insights into the evolving nature of political activism in the digital age and enhance our understanding of the role played by social media in shaping socio-political movements.

In the subsequent chapters, this thesis will delve into a comprehensive literature review on social movements, digital activism, and the impact of social media on political mobilization. It will outline the methodology employed for the comparative analysis, including data collection and analysis techniques. The thesis will then present detailed case studies of the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements, analyzing their social media strategies, outcomes, and challenges. Finally, a comparative analysis will be conducted to identify patterns, themes, and connections between the two cases, followed by a discussion of the implications, limitations, and avenues for future research.

The study of social media's role in political mobilization is crucial in an era where digital platforms continue to shape political discourse, activism, and societal transformation. By examining the experiences and lessons learned from the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements, this research contributes to our understanding of the potential and limitations of social media as a catalyst for political change.


Literature Review

This literature review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of key theoretical frameworks, empirical studies, and debates surrounding the role of social media in political mobilization, with a particular focus on digital activism and its implications for social movements. By synthesizing existing scholarship, this section establishes the theoretical and conceptual foundations for the comparative analysis of the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements.

Theoretical Frameworks
1.1. Social Movement Theory: Social movement theory provides a framework for understanding collective action and the mobilization of individuals around shared grievances and aspirations. It explores factors such as resource mobilization, political opportunities, and framing processes. Within this framework, social media is seen as a tool that can facilitate mobilization, recruitment, and the diffusion of movement messages.

1.2. Networked Communication and Mobilization: This perspective focuses on the networked nature of social media and its ability to connect individuals and communities, enabling rapid information sharing, coordination, and the formation of collective identities. Network theories emphasize the importance of social ties, network structures, and the flow of information in facilitating mobilization processes.

Digital Activism and Social Media
2.1. Digital Activism: Digital activism refers to the use of digital technologies, including social media platforms, for political and social change. This strand of research examines the impact of online tools on activism, emphasizing the affordances and challenges presented by social media for organizing, collective action, and advocacy.

2.2. Online Mobilization and Offline Action: Scholars have explored the relationship between online mobilization and offline participation, examining how social media activism translates into real-world impact. This research examines factors that contribute to successful bridging between online and offline spheres, such as network ties, mobilization strategies, and framing processes.

Impact of Social Media on Political Mobilization
3.1. Information Sharing and Dissemination: Social media platforms facilitate the rapid spread of information, enabling activists to bypass traditional media gatekeepers and reach broader audiences. This research investigates how social media enhances the visibility of grievances, mobilizes public opinion, and influences policy agendas.

3.2. Networked Organization and Coordination: Social media's networked structure allows for decentralized organization and coordination of collective action. Studies analyze the role of social media in fostering networked organizing, examining how activists leverage platforms to form connections, disseminate instructions, and coordinate protests and demonstrations.

3.3. Framing and Narrative Construction: Scholars explore how social media platforms enable activists to frame and shape narratives, constructing compelling stories that resonate with audiences. This research examines the role of hashtags, memes, and visual content in framing political messages and shaping public discourse.

Challenges and Limitations of Social Media Activism
4.1. Censorship and Surveillance: Researchers highlight the challenges posed by state surveillance, censorship, and digital repression, which can hinder the effectiveness of social media activism. This strand of research investigates how activists navigate these challenges and employ strategies to overcome restrictions.

4.2. Disinformation and Manipulation: The spread of misinformation and the manipulation of social media platforms for political purposes are areas of concern. Scholars explore the impact of disinformation campaigns, algorithmic biases, and echo chambers on political mobilization, examining their potential to shape public opinion and undermine movements.

4.3. Inequality and Digital Divide: The digital divide and socio-economic inequalities influence who can access and effectively use social media for political activism. Researchers analyze how disparities in digital literacy, access, and technological resources shape the participation and impact of marginalized communities.

By drawing on these theoretical frameworks and empirical studies, this literature review establishes the context for examining the impact of social media on political mobilization in the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements. The subsequent chapters will delve into detailed case studies, analyzing the strategies, outcomes, challenges, and implications of social media usage in these movements.






















Methodology

this chapter outlines the methodology employed for the comparative analysis of the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements, focusing on the role of social media in political mobilization. It describes the research design, data collection methods, and data analysis techniques utilized to address the research objectives and answer the research questions.

Research Design
This study utilizes a comparative case study approach to examine the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements as distinct cases of political mobilization facilitated by social media. By comparing these cases, we can identify similarities, differences, and patterns in social media strategies, outcomes, and challenges, contributing to a deeper understanding of the impact of social media on political mobilization.

Data Collection Methods
2.1. Interviews: The primary data collection method involves conducting interviews with activists and participants who were directly involved in the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements. These interviews provide valuable insights into their experiences, perspectives, and strategies for utilizing social media for political mobilization. Semi-structured interviews will be conducted to allow for flexibility in exploring relevant themes and to capture diverse viewpoints.

2.2. Primary Sources: Primary sources, including social media posts, videos, and images shared during the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements, will be collected. These sources offer firsthand accounts of events, as well as examples of the strategies employed on social media platforms.

2.3. Secondary Sources: Secondary sources, such as academic literature, news articles, reports, and analyses, will be extensively reviewed. These sources provide a broader context, historical background, and scholarly interpretations of the movements, helping to enrich the understanding of the social and political dynamics at play.

Data Analysis Techniques
3.1. Qualitative Analysis: The collected data, including interview transcripts, primary sources, and secondary sources, will be analyzed using qualitative analysis techniques. This involves a systematic examination of the data to identify patterns, themes, and key findings related to the research questions. The analysis will be guided by the theoretical frameworks and concepts discussed in the literature review.

3.2. Comparative Analysis: A comparative analysis will be conducted to identify similarities and differences in the use of social media by the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements. This analysis will examine social media strategies, patterns of mobilization, outcomes achieved, and challenges faced within the unique socio-political contexts of each movement.

Ethical Considerations
this research adheres to ethical guidelines for conducting research with human participants. Informed consent will be obtained from participants before conducting interviews, and their identities will be kept confidential. Care will be taken to ensure the respectful handling and anonymization of sensitive data. Additionally, ethical considerations will be taken into account when analyzing and reporting the data, ensuring the findings are presented accurately and without misrepresentation.

Limitations
it is important to acknowledge the potential limitations of this research. First, the sample of participants interviewed may not represent the entire spectrum of activists involved in the movements. Second, relying on self-reported accounts and social media data introduces potential biases and challenges in verifying information. Lastly, the research focuses on two specific movements and their use of social media, which may limit the generalizability of the findings to other contexts or movements.

By utilizing a rigorous research design, collecting diverse data sources, and employing qualitative analysis techniques, this methodology aims to provide a comprehensive and nuanced understanding of the impact of social media on political mobilization in the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movements. The subsequent chapters will present the findings of the analysis, contributing to the existing literature on digital activism, social movements, and political communication.




Case Study 1: Arab Spring

Introduction:

This case study examines the Arab Spring, a series of uprisings and protests that occurred across several countries in the Middle East and North Africa region, beginning in late 2010. The Arab Spring represented a significant wave of political mobilization driven by demands for political freedom, economic opportunities, and social justice. Social media played a crucial role in facilitating and shaping the trajectory of these movements, enabling activists to organize, disseminate information, and challenge authoritarian regimes.

Socio-Political Context:
The Arab Spring emerged against a backdrop of long-standing grievances, including political repression, economic inequality, corruption, and human rights abuses. High levels of youth unemployment, coupled with widespread frustration and dissatisfaction with authoritarian regimes, created a fertile environment for mobilization and collective action.

Role of Social Media:
Social media platforms, such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and blogs, played a central role in the Arab Spring by providing activists with new channels for communication, organization, and mobilization. The decentralized and accessible nature of social media allowed individuals to connect, share information, and coordinate protests in real time, bypassing traditional media channels that were often controlled or censored by the state.

Strategies Employed:
a) Information Sharing and Dissemination: Activists utilized social media to bypass state-controlled media and disseminate information, images, videos, and eyewitness accounts of protests, government repression, and human rights abuses. These platforms allowed for the rapid spread of information, increasing the visibility of the uprisings and attracting international attention.

b) Coordination and Mobilization: Social media facilitated the coordination of protests and collective action. Activists used platforms like Facebook and Twitter to organize demonstrations, disseminate instructions, and rally support. Hashtags and event pages served as mobilization tools, allowing activists to reach wider audiences and foster a sense of unity and purpose.

c) Framing and Narratives: Social media enabled activists to shape and frame narratives, challenging dominant narratives propagated by state-controlled media. Memes, images, videos, and hashtags were employed to create powerful symbols, slogans, and visual representations that resonated with audiences, attracting solidarity and support.

Outcomes and Challenges:
a) Outcomes: The Arab Spring resulted in significant political transformations, including the overthrow of longstanding dictators in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, and Yemen. Social media played a crucial role in documenting and disseminating information about human rights abuses, mobilizing international support, and fostering a sense of empowerment among activists.

b) Challenges: Despite its instrumental role, social media activism faced challenges and limitations. Governments attempted to suppress online dissent through censorship, surveillance, and internet shutdowns. The spread of misinformation and rumors on social media also posed challenges to organizing and maintaining the credibility of the movements.

Conclusion:

The Arab Spring serves as a paradigmatic example of how social media can catalyze and shape political mobilization. Through the strategic use of social media platforms, activists were able to overcome barriers of censorship, mobilize large-scale protests, and challenge repressive regimes. The case study of the Arab Spring provides valuable insights into the impact of social media on political change, highlighting the potential of digital activism in shaping contemporary political landscapes.









Case Study 2: Black Lives Matter Movement

Introduction:

This case study focuses on the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement, which emerged in 2013 following the acquittal of Trayvon Martin's killer and gained significant momentum in the United States. The movement sought to raise awareness about systemic racism, police brutality, and social injustice faced by Black communities. Social media played a crucial role in mobilizing activists, organizing protests, and amplifying the movement's message.

Emergence and Context:
The Black Lives Matter movement emerged in response to a long history of racial inequality, police violence, and structural racism in the United States. Incidents such as the killings of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Breonna Taylor, among others, served as catalysts for public outrage and mobilization.

Role of Social Media:
Social media platforms, particularly Twitter, played a central role in the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement. Activists leveraged social media to raise awareness, share stories of racial injustice, and mobilize support. Hashtags such as #BlackLivesMatter and #SayTheirNames went viral, helping to galvanize widespread attention and engagement.

Strategies Employed:
a) Hashtag Activism: Hashtags were used to consolidate narratives, generate visibility, and facilitate broader conversations about racial injustice. Activists employed hashtags to share personal experiences, disseminate information, and organize collective action, enabling the movement's message to spread rapidly across social media platforms.

b) Live Streaming and Citizen Journalism: Activists utilized live streaming platforms, such as Facebook Live and Periscope, to document protests, police interactions, and acts of civil disobedience in real time. This form of citizen journalism allowed for the unfiltered dissemination of information, bypassing traditional media channels and providing an alternative narrative to mainstream coverage.

c) Networked Mobilization: Social media platforms facilitated networked mobilization, enabling activists to connect, collaborate, and organize on a local and national scale. Networks were formed, fostering collaboration and solidarity among activists, grassroots organizations, and supporters across different geographic locations.

Outcomes and Challenges:
a) Outcomes: The Black Lives Matter movement brought issues of racial injustice and police brutality to the forefront of public discourse. It succeeded in mobilizing diverse communities, sparking nationwide protests, and pushing for policy reforms at local and national levels. Social media played a crucial role in disseminating information, creating awareness, and sustaining the movement's momentum.

b) Challenges: The Black Lives Matter movement faced backlash, online harassment, and efforts to delegitimize its message. The spread of misinformation and counter-narratives on social media posed challenges, necessitating constant fact-checking and vigilance. Moreover, the movement had to navigate tensions between online activism and offline impact, ensuring sustained engagement beyond viral moments.

Conclusion:

The Black Lives Matter movement exemplifies the power of social media in raising awareness, mobilizing communities, and challenging systemic injustices. Through the strategic use of hashtags, live streaming, and networked mobilization, the movement transformed the national conversation around racial inequality. The case study of the Black Lives Matter movement underscores the significance of social media as a tool for political mobilization and sheds light on the complex dynamics of online activism and offline impact.









Comparative Analysis: Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter Movement

Introduction:

This comparative analysis aims to examine and draw parallels between the Arab Spring and the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement in terms of their utilization of social media for political mobilization. While these movements emerged in distinct socio-political contexts, they both harnessed the power of social media platforms to amplify their voices, organize collective action, and challenge existing power structures. This analysis seeks to identify key similarities, differences, and patterns in their social media strategies, outcomes, and challenges.

Utilization of Social Media:
Both the Arab Spring and the BLM movement effectively utilized social media platforms for mobilization. Activists in both movements leveraged platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube to share information, disseminate messages, and rally support. Hashtags, such as #Arab Spring and #BlackLivesMatter, played a crucial role in consolidating narratives, generating visibility, and fostering a sense of collective identity and purpose.

Information Sharing and Dissemination:
In both movements, social media served as a powerful tool for sharing information and documenting events. Activists used social media to bypass traditional media channels and directly communicate with the public. The rapid dissemination of videos, images, and eyewitness accounts on social media played a significant role in raising awareness, mobilizing support, and exposing human rights abuses.

Networked Organization and Mobilization:
Both movements demonstrated the ability of social media to facilitate networked organization and mobilization. Social media platforms allowed activists to connect, collaborate, and coordinate efforts on a local, national, and international scale. Networks of activists, grassroots organizations, and supporters were formed, fostering collaboration, solidarity, and the rapid spread of information.

Framing and Messaging:
Social media provided a platform for framing and shaping narratives in both movements. Activists utilized powerful visual content, such as images, videos, and memes, to convey their messages and challenge dominant narratives. Hashtags were employed strategically to encapsulate and disseminate key messages, creating a shared identity and promoting engagement.

Outcomes and Impact:
Both the Arab Spring and the BLM movement had significant outcomes and impacts. The Arab Spring led to the overthrow of longstanding dictators in several countries and initiated political transformations. The BLM movement generated widespread attention, ignited nationwide protests, and pushed for policy reforms regarding racial inequality and police brutality. Social media played a crucial role in mobilizing support, sustaining momentum, and catalyzing public dialogue.

Challenges and Limitations:
Both movements faced challenges and limitations in their use of social media. Governments in the Arab Spring countries attempted to suppress online dissent through censorship, surveillance, and internet shutdowns. The BLM movement encountered online backlash, misinformation campaigns, and efforts to undermine its message. Both movements also had to navigate tensions between online activism and offline impact, ensuring sustained engagement and translating digital mobilization into tangible societal change.

Conclusion:

The comparative analysis reveals striking similarities between the Arab Spring and the Black Lives Matter movement in terms of their utilization of social media for political mobilization. Both movements effectively employed social media platforms for information sharing, networked organization, framing narratives, and mobilizing support. Despite their differences in socio-political contexts, the movements demonstrated the potential of social media to amplify marginalized voices, challenge existing power structures, and initiate socio-political transformations. However, they also faced challenges such as government repression, online backlash, and the need to translate digital activism into tangible impact. This comparative analysis enhances our understanding of the evolving nature of political activism in the digital age and highlights the continued significance of social media as a tool for political mobilization.


Implications and Conclusions

Implications:

The comparative analysis of the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement in terms of their use of social media for political mobilization carries several implications for understanding the role of digital activism and its impact on contemporary political landscapes.

Empowerment and Amplification of Marginalized Voices: Both movements demonstrate the power of social media in empowering marginalized communities and amplifying their voices. Social media platforms provide a space for individuals and communities to share their experiences, challenge dominant narratives, and mobilize support, thereby fostering a sense of agency and empowerment.

Dissemination of Information and Shaping Public Discourse: Social media enables the rapid dissemination of information, allowing activists to bypass traditional media channels and directly shape public discourse. By sharing videos, images, and firsthand accounts, activists can raise awareness about social injustices, human rights abuses, and systemic issues, ultimately influencing public opinion and policy agendas.

Networked Mobilization and Transnational Solidarity: Social media facilitates networked mobilization, connecting activists, organizations, and supporters across geographic boundaries. This enables the formation of transnational solidarity networks, fostering collaboration, sharing strategies, and mutual support. Social media transcends physical barriers, creating opportunities for global awareness and action.

Challenges of State Repression and Disinformation: The analysis highlights the challenges faced by activists utilizing social media platforms, including state repression, censorship, surveillance, and the spread of misinformation. Governments often attempt to control online narratives and suppress dissent, underscoring the need for activists to navigate these challenges strategically.

Conclusions:

The comparative analysis of the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter movement demonstrates the significant impact of social media on political mobilization and social change. Both movements effectively utilized social media platforms to share information, mobilize support, challenge power structures, and shape narratives.

The Arab Spring exemplified how social media facilitated the rapid dissemination of information, coordination of protests, and exposure of human rights abuses. It led to political transformations and challenged authoritarian regimes. The Black Lives Matter movement, on the other hand, harnessed social media to raise awareness about systemic racism, police brutality, and social injustice, sparking widespread protests and pushing for policy reforms.

Despite their contextual differences, both movements shared common strategies, such as the use of hashtags, networked mobilization, and the framing of narratives through powerful visual content. They faced challenges including government repression, online backlash, and the need to translate digital mobilization into tangible impact.

Overall, this comparative analysis underscores the enduring significance of social media as a tool for political mobilization, activism, and social change. It highlights the potential of digital platforms in empowering marginalized communities, disseminating information, and fostering transnational networks of solidarity. However, it also emphasizes the importance of understanding and addressing challenges such as state repression and disinformation.

As we move forward, it is crucial for scholars, policymakers, and activists to further explore the dynamics of social media activism, its limitations, and its potential to contribute to a more just and equitable society. By critically examining and building upon the experiences of movements like the Arab Spring and Black Lives Matter, we can continue to harness the power of social media for positive societal transformation.


 


 


 


 


 


 


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