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No RT-PCR report required for travelling to India: New regulations for worldwide flyers.

Passengers traveling to India will no longer be required to undertake the compulsory seven-day home isolation or an RT-PCR test on the eighth day from February 14, 2022 – according to new revised foreign departures rules announced on February 10, 2022.


The Central government of India has released modified rules and regulations regarding the COVID-19 guidelines for overseas travelers coming to India from February 14th. The ministry has declared, in its most updated rules, that travelers arriving in India would not be required to take a compulsory RT-PCR test eight days following their arrival. Furthermore, government officials have removed the mandatory seven-day home quarantine for citizens.


Union Health Minister Mansukh Mandaviya said on Twitter that a representative sample of 2% of overseas visitors from all nations will be taken upon arrival. They will be permitted to exit the airports upon submission of their swabs.


Erstwhile, it was specifically mentioned in the rules that if the overseas travelers' were negative, they would continue to self-monitor their condition for the next 7 days.


"The Ministry of Health has announced revised guidelines for international travelers, which will go into effect on February 14th, 2022. Follow these instructions with enthusiasm, keep safe, and help the country improve its leadership in the fight against COVID-19. " The Union Health Minister tweeted about that as well.


The Union Health Minister further mentioned on Twitter, "In addition to submitting a negative RT-PCR document (taken 72 hours before departure), there is an option to upload a certificate of completion of the full primary vaccination schedule of COVID-19 vaccination made available by countries on a sharing basis." post-arrival self-monitoring period of 14 days, as opposed to the previous need for 7 days of home quarantine. Something like an RT-PCR test on the eighth day and uploading the results to the Air Suvidha site has been waived. "


The updated rules also indicate that the compulsory 72 Hour RTPCR is no longer a requirement and passengers may submit their complete vaccination certificates.


Travelers who are found to be unwell during post-arrival screening must be immediately isolated and sent to a health care facility in keeping with health protocols. If they test positive, their connections must be identified and treated following the process.


If such passengers test COVID-positive, their specimens should be sent to the INSACOG laboratory network for genetic testing, and they will be allowed to be treated under standard procedures, according to the revised guidelines of the nation.


Please click the below link to find the Revised COVID-19 rules and regulations for international travellers: https://www.mea.gov.in/guidelines-for-international-arrivals.htm


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Tags: #test #COVID-19 #International #Rules #travellers #RTPCR



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