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Acid attack scarred her face, but not her spirit

Anju Rajput, a 15-year-old girl, was returning home from school one afternoon when someone called out her name.  The moment she turned, she felt a searing pain as someone splashed acid on her face.


A 55-year- old man, who had been making advances, committed this dastardly crime on Anju upon being rejected.


The acid quickly ate through her skin and facial tissue. She risked losing an eye.


“He defaced and traumatised me for life,” said Anju. “I had to drop out of school at an early age due to the intense social stigma. I could only complete the rest of my education after joining an NGO that helped me gather all the courage to face the world.”


 


Anju is a bright, cheerful woman. She has hope in her eyes  as she speaks calmly of her arduous journey so far. She attributed her rehabilitation and confidence to her parents who always stood by her .


It took years of struggle, after so many surgeries, to regain her strength and  to finally look into the mirror a face that was disfigured beyond recognition.


 


Such attacks fuelled  by rejection and  dejection may destroy a person’s identity, but not her spirit.


“The acid can only change our face, but certainly can’t ruin our soul,” said Anju, in a voice brimming with courage.


She is now completing her education to fulfil her dream of becoming a teacher. Her family is very supportive of her aspirations.


 


After being rehabilitated, Anju and many other such young acid-attack survivors work in She-roes café, run by Chaanv foundation. It  is purportedly the world’s first food café that is run by acid-attack survivors. 


Anju Rajput, a 15-year-old girl, was returning home from school one afternoon when someone called out her name.  The moment she turned, she felt a searing pain as someone splashed acid on her face.


A 55-year- old man, who had been making advances, committed this dastardly crime on Anju upon being rejected.


The acid quickly ate through her skin and facial tissue. She risked losing an eye.


“He defaced and traumatised me for life,” said Anju. “I had to drop out of school at an early age due to the intense social stigma. I could only complete the rest of my education after joining an NGO that helped me gather all the courage to face the world.”


 


Anju is a bright, cheerful woman. She has hope in her eyes  as she speaks calmly of her arduous journey so far. She attributed her rehabilitation and confidence to her parents who always stood by her .


It took years of struggle, after so many surgeries, to regain her strength and  to finally look into the mirror a face that was disfigured beyond recognition.


 


Such attacks fuelled  by rejection and  dejection may destroy a person’s identity, but not her spirit.


“The acid can only change our face, but certainly can’t ruin our soul,” said Anju, in a voice brimming with courage.


She is now completing her education to fulfil her dream of becoming a teacher. Her family is very supportive of her aspirations.


 


After being rehabilitated, Anju and many other such young acid-attack survivors work in She-roes café, run by Chaanv foundation. It  is purportedly the world’s first food café that is run by acid-attack survivors. 


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